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March 8, 2017: LMP Welcomes Professors Laura Diaz Leal and Maria Eugenia Reyes Ramos

By Laura Villa Torres

LMP staff (center) with visiting scholars (far right and left)

LMP staff (center) with visiting scholars (far right and left)

 

The Latino Migration Project hosted visiting scholars and professors Laura Diaz Leal and Maria Eugenia Reyes Ramos, from the Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana-Unidad Xochimilco.

As part of their visit, professors Diaz Leal and Reyes Ramos presented their research at the Southern Oral History Program and Duke University using some oral histories that are part of the New Roots/Nuevas Raíces collection. They also participated in the APPLES Guanajuato Class where they interacted with students who travel to Guanajuato for their Alternative Spring Break experience.

Visiting scholars also met with local representatives from Mexico and other community leaders, to explore issues faced by the Mexican community in North Carolina. Finally, the professors explored collaborations with the Latino Migration Project to possibly replicate the New Roots Archive in Mexico, as a sister archive, to open the possibility for students exchanges in the future, and to explore the publication of a special edition of their home department´s journal for a publication of Spanish articles to disseminate the work done in NC for Spanish-speaking audiences.

Professors commented about their experience:

“Nuestra experiencia en la UNC , desde la llegada hemos estado atendidas y cuidadas en todo momento, Con un programa bien elaborado de actividades a realizar. Ha sido sorprendente conocer la Universidad de Chapell Hill, con un campues tan grande y bien distribuido y atendido.

Las actividades que han sido planeadas , han sido cubiertas en tiempo y forma y horario y las personas que hemos tenido oportunidad de entrevistar , han sido cordiales, atentas y han accedido a nuestras entrevistas, tanto población inmigrante mexicana como personas que dirigen instituciones.

Han sido un aprendizaje y una experiencia de intercambio importante para nuestro desarrollo, aprendizaje y nuevos conocimientos. Esperamos poder continuar con este intercambio, ya que han muchas cosas que podemos aportar desde Mèxico y muchos aspectos que hemos entendido y que ustedes nos aportan a nosotros.

El campus de la Universidad me ha impresionado mucho por sus dimensiones, por la organización , por la cantidad de programas que ofrece, por las áreas en que se trabaja por el número de alumnos que atiende. Nos impresionan todos los servicios con que cuentan los alumnos, es algo de llamar mucho la atención. Vemos una ciudad universitaria y eso hace muy cómoda la estancia para los alumnos. Como invitadas es conocer otro modelo de universidad, que también nos hace reflexionar en nuestras propias Universidades , en lo que nosotros tenemos en Mèxico y nos da idea de las cuestiones que podríamos implementar allá.”

We were so glad to host such wonderful guests! We hope you will come again!

 

February 17, 2017: LMP staff participate in 2017 annual Engagement Units Summit

 

From left to right: LMP team members Laura Villa Torres, Jessica White, Sara Peña and Maria Silvia Ramírez.

From left to right: LMP team members Laura Villa Torres, Jessica White, Sara Peña and Maria Silvia Ramírez.

 

The Latino Migration Project (LMP) presented a poster at the annual Engagement Units Summit Feb. 10, which was hosted by the Carolina Engagement Council at the Carolina Club, George Watts Hill Alumni Center. Team members discussed LMP initiatives of Building Integrated Communities, New Roots/Nuevas Raíces, and APPLES Global Course Guanajuato.

The summit focused on engaged experiential education: to enhance student learning and support communities. The summit was for campus engagement units and community partners. Centers, institutes, schools, departments and student organizations sent teams that represented overall units or specific efforts within a unit.

The program included:

Keynote address by Dr. Tania Mitchell, nationally recognized expert in the field of experiential education from the University of Minnesota, Presentations on successful models for undergraduate, graduate and professional student experiential education, and Roundtable discussions on how the University could better support and enhance experiential education on campus and with communities.

 

February 7, 2017: New Roots Welcomes Roman Scholar Micol Drago

 

From left to right: Building Integrated Communities Researcher and Program Coordinator, Jessica White, Roman Scholar Micol Drago, and LMP Director Hannah Gill

 

As New Roots rolled out its new website in 2016 thanks to support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, we are delighted that our efforts to make the oral histories globally accessible are having some initial success. In October 2016, New Roots staff had the opportunity to meet Micol Drago, a student from the University of Roma 3 in Rome, Italy, while on a visit to North Carolina. She discovered the New Roots online resources in the course of her research on Latina and Latino identity in the United States. The New Roots Latino Oral Histories have become the primary source for her PhD thesis, which is entitled “Identity in Latinas and Latinos’ oral histories from the New Roots – Latino Migration Project.” We asked Micol some questions about her research and use of the archive in order to better understand how it is being used by foreign scholars.

Hannah Gill (HG): How did you find the New Roots Oral Histories?

Micol Drago (MD): I conducted extensive research looking for archives of oral histories of Latinos and Latinas in the United States. This is the best archive I’ve found in terms of accessibility and quality of interviews on Latino identity. Also, it’s an ongoing archive with recent materials that is well-structured.

HG: What are some of the more interesting things you have discovered using the archive for your research?

MD: Race and culture are important parts of the complex Latino and Latina identities in the United States. . . Anyone can be “American,” it’s an identity linked to choice. By contrast, in Italy, being “Italian” is not a choice, it’s more linked to one’s heritage and race.

HG: How has migration impacted Italian society in recent years?

MD: Europe has been impacted by the global refugee crisis, and many migrants from the Middle East and Africa now live in Italy. Society is really changing in Italy, and Rome is an international place. What is happening in the United States with migration is relevant to Europe, and we can learn a lot from understanding the history of migration in the United States.

Thank you, Micol! We wish you the best of luck with your studies!

 

November 18, 2016: New Roots/Nuevas Raíces team member María Ramírez featured in SILS news

 

Read it now!

We are so pleased to share New Roots/Nuevas Raíces team member and current Master’s student Maria Ramirez is featured in the UNC School of Information and Library Science (SILS) news. She and SILS alumna Jaycie Vos (MSLS ’13) presented their work with New Roots/Nuevas Raíces: Voices from Carolina del Norte at the Oral History Association Annual Meeting on October 14, 2016, in Long Beach, Calif. At the meeting, Vos, Ramirez, and New Roots Director Hannah Gill accepted the OHA’s 2016 Elizabeth B. Mason Project Award, which recognizes outstanding oral history projects.

 

November 8, 2016: New Roots/Nuevas Raíces serves on “Migration Narratives” panel

Thank you to everyone who came out to the “Migration Narratives” panel! Special thanks to our own panelists Laura Villa Torres, Dr. Hannah Gill, and Felicia Arriaga from the New Roots/Nuevas Raíces oral history project. We enjoyed every minute!

About New Roots/Nuevas Raíces

This digital archive and information system is a joint effort between the Latino Migration Project, SOHP, and University Libraries. It’s a fully bilingual platform for sharing the oral history interviews collected as part of the New Roots: Voices from Carolina del Norte project, which focuses on stories of migration, settlement, and integration in North Carolina. Explore it now!

 

Felicia Arriaga (far right) spoke about her oral history on New Roots/Nuevas Raíces.

 Felicia Arriaga (far right) spoke about her oral history on New Roots/Nuevas Raíces.

 

Laura Villa Torres (far left) and Dr. Hannah Gill (center) spoke about collecting narratives and disseminating stories on NewRoots.lib.unc.edu

Laura Villa Torres (far left) and Dr. Hannah Gill (center) spoke about collecting narratives and disseminating stories on NewRoots.lib.unc.edu

 

October 17, 2016: New Roots/Nuevas Raíces team members receive Elizabeth Mason Award in Long Beach, CA

 

Pictured left to right: Maria Silvia Ramirez, Dr. Hannah Gill, Jaycie Vos. Photo credit: Adrienne Cain, MLS, CA; Creator and Curator of Oral Histories

Pictured left to right: Maria Silvia Ramirez, Dr. Hannah Gill, Jaycie Vos. Photo credit: Adrienne Cain, MLS, CA; Creator and Curator of Oral Histories

 

New Roots/Nuevas Raíces team members Maria, Hannah and Jaycie traveled to Long Beach, CA to accept the team’s Elizabeth Mason Award. In 1993, the Oral History Association established a series of awards to recognize outstanding achievement in oral history. We are so honored the New Roots/Nuevas Raíces Latino Oral History Initiative (http://newroots.lib.unc.edu/) has received the Elizabeth B. Mason Project Award. Thank you to the selection committee, the New Roots/Nuevas Raíces team, the National Endowment for the Humanities , The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the U.S. Department of Education.

Congratulations again, team!

 

August 8, 2016: New Roots/Nuevas Raíces wins Oral History Association award

 

See the list of winners here.

 

In 1993, the Oral History Association established a series of awards to recognize outstanding achievement in oral history. We are so honored the New Roots/Nuevas Raíces Latino Oral History Initiative (http://newroots.lib.unc.edu/) has received the Elizabeth B. Mason Project Award. Thank you to the selection committee, the New Roots/Nuevas Raíces team, the National Endowment for the Humanities , The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the U.S. Department of Education.

 

August 3, 2016: NEW interviews available, New Roots/Nuevas Raíces

 

 

New oral history interviews are now available in the New Roots: Voices from Carolina del Norte digital archive. The interviews were conducted in the spring of 2015 by UNC undergraduate students in Dr. Hannah Gill’s APPLES Latin American Immigrant Perspectives: Ethnography in Action course. These recently added stories delve into the complex social dynamics that many immigrants navigate in the United States and include themes that explore the relationship between family and food. The interviewees, like our friend who we’ve featured before, provide first-hand accounts of their motives for migrating, their family traditions, and offer compelling perspectives on the healthcare and educational systems of this country. To learn more follow these links (below) to their individual stories.

Un nuevo grupo de entrevistas de historias orales ahora esta disponible en el archivo digital Nuevas Raíces: Voces de Carolina del Norte. Las entrevistas fueron realizadas en la primavera del 2015 por estudiantes en la Universidad de Carolina del Norte en Chapel Hill inscritos en el curso de la Dra. Hannah Gill llamado APPLES Perspectivas de Inmigrantes Latinoamericanos: Etnografía en Acción. Estas historias recién añadidas profundizan en la compleja dinámica social que muchos inmigrantes navegan en los Estados Unidos e incluyen temas que exploran la relación entre la familia y la comida. Los entrevistados, como nuestro amigo que hemos presentado antes, proveen información de primera mano sobre sus motivos para emigrar, sus tradiciones familiares, y ofrecen cautivantes perspectivas sobre los sistemas de educación y atención medica de este país. Para obtener más información siga estos enlaces (abajo) a sus historias individuales.

 
 

Special thanks to all the students who conducted the interviews and each interviewee for sharing their story.

Un agradecimiento especial a todos los estudiantes que realizaron las entrevistas y a cada entrevistado por compartir su historia.

 

July 7, 2016: A look at “accessioning” in New Roots/Nuevas Raíces

By María Silvia Ramírez, New Roots Bilingual Archivist

At New Roots we are constantly looking for ways to improve access to a growing collection of oral history interviews related to Latin American migration that provide first-hand accounts of the demographic changes that have occurred over the last 20 years. I had the opportunity to examine one of the core functions of archival practice and collection development: accessioning.

 

Accessioning is an essential first step that allows the archivist to gain intellectual control over the materials by knowing what is to be included in the collection and which restrictions apply for access. Our research team conducted semi-structured and contextual interviews in order to examine the current system for adding oral history interviews to the archive and provide recommendations that can help streamline the process. Read the full report here.

 

June 30, 2016: New Roots/Nuevas Raíces featured in The Southern Sociologist

We are very pleased to share that New Roots/Nuevas Raíces is featured by our very own Felicia Arriaga in The Southern Sociologist, Summer 2016 edition. Check out the article (below)!

Teaching Note
Felicia Arriaga, Duke University

Incorporating Art into Lessons on Immigration, Race, and Development in the United States I am the only graduate student studying immigration in my department, which means grad students and faculty often ask me to guest lecture on immigration. I teach immigration with an intentional focus on racialized immigrants and citizenship status as a marker of stratification. I also incorporate popular education techniques where I draw from both my own and the students’ lived experiences.

One way to begin having this conversation is to introduce them to these subjects with background readings by Natalia Molina and Douglas Massey and incorporating visual aids into group work. This visual aid allows us to have an in-class discussion analyzing a mural borrowed from Student Action with Farmworkers (SAF), a non-profit I interned with for two years and where I currently serve on the board. These types of aids provide a holistic understanding of seemingly simple issues and appeal to different learning styles. The mural depicted is a production of the Levante Leadership Institute and the Beehive Collective (please see the original post for images).

The youth who worked on this mural are from farmworker families and most have worked in the fields at some point in their lives. I was initially drawn to work with this non-profit to learn more about educational issues facing the Latino/a community in North Carolina, but I stayed because of the connections I’ve made between my parents’ experiences as farmworkers in the Southeast and those of the families participating in SAF programs.

The left hand side of the mural depicts the current conditions of farmworkers and on the right is the aspirations and dreams of the young people, some of whom aspire to achieve more education but who also recognize that farmworkers should be able to complete their work with dignity. In class sessions, I typically ask the students to get into small groups and then choose an area of the mural they are able to contextualize with evidence from class readings, an area they don’t understand, or an area that just draws their attention.

Each group then describes why they chose that area and other students are welcome to respond if they believe they know more about that particular topic. For example, this section of the mural depicts the words NAFTA (North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement) in barbed wire. In a course titled Nations, Regions and the Global Economy, I emphasized this area of the mural where the implementation of NAFTA
resulted in a surplus movement of goods, but not people, back and forth across the U.S./Mexico border. This trade agreement particularly impacted small farmers within Mexico, influencing first internal migration and then external migration. The letters are in barbed wire to indicate the simultaneous militarization of the border, which also results in the deaths of economic migrants searching for alternative routes to cross the border.

Because I study both race and immigration, I’ll also include another example specifically tied to my research. This section reminds the students and myself that it is impossible to have a conversation about agricultural workers without tracing the legacy of slavery, particularly in the South. This section also allows us to dive into the relational nature of race, explained in the assigned readings from Natalia Molina’s book, How Race is Made in America: Immigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts. There are also handcuffs in this section, allowing us to begin discussing how black and brown bodies are criminalized in the present day. For many farmworkers, who are also undocumented, this criminalization means they are also subject to the threat of deportation, particularly if they desire to stand up against unjust and antiquated labor laws specific to agricultural work. This criminalization of an immigrant’s legal status and the broader
criminalization of immigration law and procedure, known as crimmigration in the legal field. Once students understand that an immigration offense (i.e., illegal crossing of the border) is different than a criminal offense, they recognize that arbitrary and sometimes retroactively implemented immigration enforcement parameters are unjust and essentially  more complicated than the national rhetoric would have us believe. By initially talking about economic and historical relationships between Mexico and the United States, students also understand that the immigration “problem” is complicated and based in historically racialized immigration policies.

Finally, I often ask individuals to come share their personal narratives and have students listen to stories about migrants, through the use of New Roots/ Nuevas Raíces collection housed at UNC-Chapel Hill in the Southern Oral History Program. This brings the theoretical to the individual level where students, particularly in the Voices in Public Policy course I teach, are able to recognize how policies implemented without involvement from those most impacted may have differential impacts depending on one’s social position.

 

June 10, 2016: NEWEST feature of New Roots/Nuevas Raíces: Meet the interviewers!

 

Pictured : Fran Reuland, UNC Global Course Guanajuato Class of 2016

Pictured : Fran Reuland, UNC Global Course Guanajuato Class of 2016

 

We are so excited to share the NEWEST feature of New Roots/Nuevas Raíces called “Meet the Interviewers“/”Conoce a las y los entrevistadores.”

Get to know featured faces from the UNC Global Course Guanajuato class, who were behind some of the interviews on newroots.lib.unc.edu. Read more to learn about their projects and reflections on the experience.

 

June 10, 2016: WATCH NOW: New Roots/Nuevas Raíces Documentary

WATCH

New Roots/Nuevas Raíces is a digital archive that contains the oral histories of Latin American migrants in North Carolina and the experiences of North Carolinians that have worked for the integration of new settlers into this southern state. Latino migrants have put down new roots in the United States South and opened up a distinct chapter in the long history of Latin American migration to the United States. Visit newroots.lib.unc.edu to explore the archive.

 

New Roots/Nuevas Raíces es un archivo digital que contiene las historias orales de migrantes latinoamericanos en Carolina del Norte y las experiencias de las personas de Carolina del Norte que han trabajado para la integración de los nuevos pobladores de este estado sureño. Los migrantes latinoamericanos han puesto nuevas raíces en el Sur de los Estados Unidos y han abierto un nuevo y diferente capítulo en la larga historia de la migración latinoamericana en Estados Unidos. Visite newroots.lib.unc.edu para explorar el archivo.

 

April 29, 2016: Latino/a Lives in the South: A workshop on oral histories for the K-12 classroom

 

Sixteen K-12 teachers from across North Carolina gathered on April 23, 2016 to participate in “Latino/a Lives in the South: A workshop on oral histories for the K-12 classroom.” Teachers were introduced to the New Roots/Nuevas Raíces Oral History Archive and had the opportunity to visit the exhibit ¡NUEVOlution!. Teachers left inspired to use the tools learned to integrate Latino/a voices in their classrooms. The event was sponsored by the Consortium in Latin American and Caribbean Studies, the Latino Migration Project, and the Levine Museum of the New South.

 

The New Roots team would like to thank Kamille Bostick, Vice President for Education at the museum for facilitating our visit and meeting with participant teachers. We also want to thank Claire Shuch, Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Geography & Earth Sciences at UNC Charlotte for a great presentation.  

 

 

 

February 7, 2016: New Roots/Nuevas Raíces Program Reception and Launch

 

Thank you to the over 90 community members who came to celebrate the launch of the New Roots / Nuevas Raíces Latino oral history collection. This bilingual collection of interviews, transcribed in both Spanish and English, focuses on Latino/a migration and the formation of new communities throughout the South.

Featuring the voices of students, workers, and activists, this collection brings home the challenges faced by recent immigrants as well as their children and grandchildren. The program included a brief video which documented the project’s evolution, followed by comments from library archivists and community partners. The reception featured music by Charanga Carolina and held listening stations where guests could experience interviews first-hand.

 

October 18, 2015: New Roots feature in Oral History in the Digital Age

 

Click here to read Jaycie Vos’s post.

 

An article written by Coordinator of Collections, Southern Oral History Program and Metadata Task Force co-founder Jaycie Vos about the upcoming New Roots/Nuevas Raices metadata site was published in Oral History in the Digital Age, a product of an Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Jaycie Vos, sohp.org/staff

Vos writes about the inception of the new site and the process of increasing visibility, reaching larger audiences, and improving access to New Roots oral histories. She also explains the advantages of metadata, and the exciting features coming spring 2016 when the site launches.

“This New Roots project gave the team at UNC fresh eyes toward oral history metadata and inspired us to ask ‘What do we really need?’ and ‘What do our users want?’ in ways that encouraged clarity, directness, and ease of use in describing oral histories and developing new features to reach new audiences,” said Vos. “This also informs and reflects the work of the Oral History Association’s Metadata Task Force, founded in 2014, which seeks to promote knowledge about oral history metadata and collaboration across the profession.”

Learn more about the OHA Metadata Task Force here.

About

Since 2007, faculty, staff, and students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) have conducted oral history interviews focused on issues relating to Latino migration to North Carolina and the formation of Latino communities. The interviews are in English or Spanish, and interviewees include immigrants, U.S.-born second generations, professionals who work with immigrants, policy makers, religious leaders, educators, students, and local business owners. This growing initiative, called New Roots, is part of the Latino Migration Project, under the direction of Dr. Hannah Gill, in collaboration with the Center for Global Initiatives, the Institute for the Study of the Americas, and the Southern Oral History Program (SOHP). Since 2011, these interviews have been archived and made accessible online through the SOHP’s collection in the Southern Historical Collection in Wilson Library at UNC. Thanks to a generous award from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Latino Migration Project, the SOHP, and University Libraries at UNC are working to make New Roots accessible to broader regional, national, and global audiences in new ways beyond the library catalog, finding aid, and SOHP digital archive.

 

July 28, 2015: Staff Spotlight: Meet Maria Silvia Ramirez

 

  Established in 2006, The Latino Migration Project is a collaborative program of the Institute for the Study of the Americas and the Center for Global Initiatives at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Today we are delighted to feature our newest staff member, Maria Silvia Ramirez, who works as an Archival Assistant. Maria took some time out of her day to tell us more about herself, her role with the Latino Migration Project, and where we can find her when she’s not in class or working (hint, it involves making something warm!).

Q: Maria, thank you so much for joining us today! Tell us a little more about yourself.

A: I was born in 1988 in Caracas, Venezuela. We moved to Ft.lauderdale, Florida in 1997 when I was 9-years-old. I was fortunate to be so young when we arrived. I feel that at that age, it’s much easier to adapt to a new culture and language. After graduating from the University of Florida with a B.A in German Studies, I wasn’t sure which direction my career should take. Eventually I decided that Librarianship was the right fit for me – I love organizing information and am passionate about helping communities. The SILS program here at UNC has been really great and I’m very happy to call North Carolina my new home!

Q: Well we’re certainly glad you’re here! Tell us what brought you to the Latino Migration Project. 

A: I was lucky to come across a job posting in the SILS [School of Information and Library Science] listserv. At first I didn’t know much about the organization, but I knew I could use my Spanish language skills in this position. I’ve since realized this job offers a very special connection to my own roots. The perspectives of minority groups can easily be neglected in historical narratives, so preserving the oral histories of latino people who made a journey similar to my own is very rewarding.

Q: We look forward to the great work you will do with New Roots/Nuevas Raíces and more! Tell us what you’re looking forward to the most.

A: I look forward to working with such a wonderful group of people to enhance access to these important stories. I have listened to many of the recorded interviews as part of my daily tasks and I’m truly humbled by the difficulties many of the interviewees face. I am proud to be part of an organization that actively seeks these narratives out and I’ll do my best to help the team make a great website that both scholars and the general public will be able to easily access.

Q: When you’re not in class studying Information and Library Science or working with us here, where can we find you?

A: I’m a bit of a homebody. I recently started learning to crochet and have been obsessed with making blankets. It’s a good thing winter is coming. I also love to draw, read, and watch the news. I live in Carrboro which has these great coffee shops I enjoy spending time at.

Wow, we’ll know who to come to once the snow gets here! Thank you SO much for your time, Maria! We look forward to a great year!

About Maria

Maria Silvia Ramirez was born in Caracas, Venezuela and immigrated to the United States with her family when she was 9-years-old. Adjusting to a different culture and learning to speak a new language instilled a deep fascination for languages and understanding other cultures that later led to a Bachelor of Arts in German from the University of Florida and a study abroad experience in Europe. Maria currently works for the Latino Migration Project as an Archival Assistant and is also earning a Master’s degree in Library and Information Science from UNC.

About New Roots/Nuevas Raíces 

New Roots / Nuevas Raíces Latino Oral Histories document demographic transformations in the North Carolina by collecting extraordinary stories of Latin American migration, settlement, and integration throughout the state. Learn more here.

 

March 23, 2015: Call to Teachers: Explore New Roots / Nuevas Raíces Latino Oral Histories

Click: New Roots World View Teacher Resource

Teachers ​with particular interest​s​ in migration, storytelling, ​Spanish, ​bilingual education and teaching with oral histories are encouraged to explore New Roots / Nuevas Raíces Latino Oral Histories.

New Roots / Nuevas Raíces Latino Oral Histories document demographic transformations in the North Carolina by collecting extraordinary stories of Latin American migration, settlement, and integration throughout the state.

These interviews can be used in high and low tech classrooms to engage students with the political, social, linguistic, cultural and human elements of Latino immigration in North Carolina. In-depth interviews in this collection are in Spanish or English and include immigrants, US-born second generations, professionals who work with immigrants, policy-makers, religious leaders, educators, students, and local business owners.

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provides access to these 175+ interviews which tell stories of courage and perseverance that chronicle journeys by foot, car, train and bus over thousands of miles from Mexican and Central American homelands, and the experiences of settling in rural and urban places unfamiliar with Spanish-speaking cultures.

For lesson ideas, classroom resources, upcoming training and events, or to plan a class or community center visit with New Roots staff, please join the New Roots listserv.

 

February 20, 2015: New Roots Update

Author Jessica English, Bilingual Documentation Archivist, catches us up on the New Roots/Nuevas Raíces team and their recent projects. 

IT staff has been hard at work…

Speaking of metadata…

After briefly considering manually entering Spanish-language metadata and metadata fields directly into the new Omeka site, and therefore separately from the current CONTENTdm-based Southern Oral History Program’s database, New Roots staff has decided to enter all bilingual metadata in CONTENTdm.

The cataloging folks on the New Roots staff had been concerned that duplicating Spanish-language metadata fields in CONTENTdm would be confusing, irrelevant and clunky for the other 5000 English-language interviews in the SOHP database. However, IT staff overcame this challenge with an elegant solution: synchronizing repeated metadata content so that only a couple of new metadata fields need to be added to CONTENTdm, minimizing the confusion and streamlining manual data entry.

Where the CONTENTdm metadata field contents are the same in English and Spanish, the CONTENTdm metadata field [Interviewee name] will feed into two Omeka metadata fields—[Interviewee name] and [Nombre de entrevistado]—and contain the same content [Borges, Jorge Luis].

We are also currently developing a new metadata schema for the project that will enhance access to the New Roots collection in both the Southern Oral History Program database and in the new Omeka site. Some of the additional metadata we are in the process of adding to New Roots records in CONTENTdm include:

Other exciting updates to the new Omeka test site:

And the drumroll, please…

Stay tuned for more exciting updates!

 

February 20, 2015: New Roots Snapshot Available Now!

 

 

Emilio Vicente (right) photographed with LMP alum Antonio De Jesus Alanis is featured in the New Roots Snapshot.

As an ongoing, permanent research initiative, New Roots / Nuevas Raíces has so far generated more than 175 audio-recorded interviews (a total of 200+ hours) and their full transcriptions, field notes, and tape logs.

 

February 11, 2015: Latino Migration Film Guide

 

Films Relevant to North Carolina

This film guide was prepared to provide a resource on understanding of Latin American migration experiences in North Carolina through documentary film. All films listed are available for free loan at http://lafilm.web.unc.edu/.

Included are documentaries and feature films on Latino immigration and settlement in North Carolina and the U.S. Southeast.  Film titles, their descriptions, and relevant discussion topics like North Carolina agriculture, migrant labor, and impacts of migration in sending countries are also featured.

Check it out! Click the link: Latino Migration Project Film Directory

 

January 23, 2015: New Roots Oral History IT Development

IT development for the New Roots Oral History project has begun! As part of the process we are reviewing our options for collection management and web publishing software. We had planned to use Omeka, but after compiling data we gathered from our stakeholders (global educators and scholars, Latino communities, museums and the media), we thought we should revisit that choice to be sure it would meet our diverse users’ needs.

 

 

January 23, 2015: New Roots/Nuevas Raíces Introduction and Summary

Oral History Presentation from jsircar1

New Roots: This growing collection of oral histories focuses on issues related to Latino migration to North Carolina and the formation of Latino communities. Interviews are conducted by LMP staff, UNC faculty and trained students in courses relating to the topic, including APPLES Global Course Guanajuato, which began conducting interviews in 2007. In-depth interviews in this collection are in Spanish or English and include immigrants, U.S.-born second generations, professionals who work with immigrants, policy-makers, religious leaders, educators, students, and local business owners. Our partners in the Southern Oral History Program and Wilson Library assist with digitization, catalogue, and preservation of audio recordings and transcripts.

 

Nuevas Raíces: Historias Orales de Latinos en los Estados Unidos es una colección de historias orales enfocada en el testimonio de inmigrantes procedentes de toda América Latina. Los ficheros digitales de cada entrevista son compilados y atesorados en el Latino Migration Project, el Southern Oral History Program, y la Wilson Library pertenecientes a la Universidad de Carolina del Norte en Chapel Hill.

 

November 20, 2014: Alumna Featured on The State of Things

 

Natalie Teague, Latin American Studies ’04, is featured on The State of Things. Teague and bilingual immigration attorney, Evelyn Smallwood, speak with Frank Stasio about their experiences providing pro bono services to women and children being help at a detention center in Artesia, New Mexico. Most of the women and children are fleeing violence in their home countries but are facing legal barriers.

 

September 22, 2014: Staff Spotlight-Jessie English

Established in 2006, The Latino Migration Project is a collaborative program of the Institute for the Study of the Americas and the Center for Global Initiatives at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Earlier, we had the pleasure of sitting down with Jessicalee White, who works with Building Integrated Communities as a Researcher and Program Coordinator. Today, we chat with Jessie English, the new Bilingual Documentation Archivist for the Latino Migration Project. Jessie took some time out of her new job to tell us a little more about herself and her future hopes, which include (but are not limited to) imagining creative solutions to discover relevant oral histories for international research, as well as outside-of-the-office hopes of becoming a cyclist to work.

Learn more about Jessie below, and we hope you will enjoy!

Q: Jessie, thank you so much for joining us today! Tell us a little about what brought you here. 

A: I came to UNC to be the bilingual documentation archivist (BDA) for the Latino Migration Project because it is pretty much my dream job! This position brings together my background in Spanish and digital humanities with my professional ambition of developing open access bilingual research resources. I am so thrilled to be working on this project that brings these diverse voices into the historical record and will provide contemporary access to them for research and learning.

Q: We’re thrilled you’re here! What are you looking forward to the most as a bilingual archivist? 

A: I am most looking forward to three years from now when we can share the finished New Roots/Nuevas Raíces Oral History Project with the world! Oral histories are a captivating mode of storytelling and important historical documents that illustrate the political, social and daily struggles and triumphs of everyday people; however, they can difficult and cumbersome to navigate. I look forward to imagining creative solutions to discover relevant oral histories for international research, as well as describing them in ways that are accessible to the general Spanish- and English-speaking public. And to make it all very pretty.

Q: We look forward to that too! When you’re not in the office, what do you enjoy doing?

A: Hiking and camping are two of my most favorite things and I am so happy to live in such a beautiful state to explore. I spend a lot of time wandering the campuses, libraries and parks in the triangle. I also like to cook delicious vegetables, read novels, and am trying to convince myself to be a bicycle commuter.

All of those things sound wonderful. Thank you again, Jessie!

Jessie English earned an MLIS from the University of Illinois where she completed an independent study to digitally preserve the community memory of the Cuban National Literacy Campaign. For the project she conducted oral history interviews with former literacy teachers, scanned newspaper clippings from 1961, and described and arranged this data for preservation at the Cuban National Literacy Campaign Museum. She has worked in public libraries to improve services for Latinos in the South as a librarian and former president of REFORMA Southeast. She has a BA in Spanish from Berea College.

 

June 6, 2014: New Roots/Nuevas Raíces Celebration!

We had a wonderful launch of “New Roots: Improving Global Access of Latino Oral Histories.” Attendees came from across UNC networks, including libraries, students, and ISA staff, to celebrate the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) award of $240,000 to the collaborative initiative of the Latino Migration Project, The Southern Oral History Program, and the University Libraries at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The NEH grant, which is awarded from the NEH Humanities Collections and Reference Resources division, will make the New Roots collection accessible to new regional, national and global public constituencies, particularly within Spanish-speaking Latino and Latin American communities. Activities will include the creation of a visually engaging bilingual website for public audiences and people who have contributed their stories; a digital catalogue and finding aids in English and Spanish; an interactive portal for teachers to share lesson plans; and a dissemination plan with Latino communities, K-16 educators, national and international oral history networks, and Mexican universities in the origin states of migrants living in North Carolina. The project will be based at UNC Chapel Hill and carried out over the course of three years.

“The growth of our Latino communities in the U.S. South is one of the most significant demographic changes in the recent history of the nation,” Dr. Gill said. “The New Roots Oral History Initiative was established in 2007 to document this important history from the perspectives of migrants themselves.”

Both Richard Szary, Director of the Wilson Library and Associate University Librarian for Special Collections, and Louis A. Pérez, Director of the Institute for the Study of the Americas, emphasized the immense amount of time invested to make this project a reality.

“Years ago, we felt there was this huge blind spot: migration, people from Latin America coming into this state,” Pérez said. “Little by little, it’s been developing into a full scale program that belongs to what we see as a new paradigm for studying Latin American presence not only in Latin America, but the Latin American presence in the United States.”

New Roots was established in 2007 to document demographic transformations in the U.S. South with stories of migration, settlement and integration in North Carolina. Read more at http://migration.unc.edu/programs/new-roots/

This growing collection of oral histories focuses on issues related to Latino migration to North Carolina and the formation of Latino communities.  Interviews are conducted by LMP staff, UNC faculty and trained students in courses relating to the topic, including APPLES Global Course Guanajuato, which began conducting interviews in 2007.  In-depth interviews in this collection are in Spanish or English and include immigrants, U.S.-born second generations, professionals who work with immigrants, policy-makers, religious leaders, educators, students, and local business owners. Our partners in the Southern Oral History Program and Wilson Library assist with digitization, catalogue, and preservation of audio recordings and transcripts.

Listen to the audio samples from the archive here.

 

 

Group enjoys a presentation summarizing the project.

 

 

Dr. Gill shares an oral history excerpt.

 

ISA Intern Antonio Alaniz (left) and Emilio Vicente (right)

 

Richard Szary, Director of Wilson Libraries, speaks about the incubation of this project and its long awaited arrival

 

May 21, 2014: Exciting News! NEH Grant will Support Latino Oral History Initiative

The National Endowment for the Humanities has awarded a grant of $240,000 to NEW ROOTS: Improving Global Access of Latino Oral Histories, a collaborative initiative of the Latino Migration Project, The Southern Oral History Program, and the University Libraries at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The New Roots Latino Oral History Initiative was established in 2007 to document demographic transformations in the U.S. South by collecting extraordinary stories of migration, settlement, and integration in North Carolina. The collection receives regular contributions of at least forty interviews annually from UNC scholars through an ongoing research program of the Latino Migration Project at the Institute for the Study of the Americas and the Center for Global Initiatives. Oral histories are archived with the Southern Oral History Program and their collections in the Southern Historical Collection in the University of Libraries of UNC Chapel Hill. The NEH grant, which is awarded from the NEH Humanities Collections and Reference Resources division, will make the New Roots collection accessible to new regional, national and global public constituencies, particularly within Spanish-speaking Latino and Latin American communities. Activities will include the creation of a visually engaging bilingual website for public audiences and people who have contributed their stories; a digital catalogue and finding aids in English and Spanish; an interactive portal for teachers to share lesson plans; and a dissemination plan with Latino communities, K-16 educators, national and international oral history networks, and Mexican universities in the origin states of migrants living in North Carolina. The project will be based at UNC Chapel Hill and carried out over the course of three years.

“The New Roots project will provide wider access to this record of the many changes affecting North Carolina. The bilingual features of the project are especially noteworthy in expanding access and will be a model for similar projects to making oral histories at UNC more discoverable to a wider audience,” said Richard Szary, Director of the Louis Round Wilson Special Collections Library and Associate University Librarian for Special Collections.

Contact: Hannah Gill, Project Director

hgill@email.unc.edu

Contact: 919-962-5453

 

May 21, 2014: Upcoming event: New Roots Oral History

 

You are invited to the Launch Celebration of New Roots/ Nuevas Raíces!

June 4, 2014 * 4:30 pm on the Rooftop of the Fed Ex Global Education Center

301 Pittsboro St, Chapel Hill, NC 27516

Join us for a celebratory launch of “New Roots: Improving Global Access of Latino Oral Histories.” This NEH-funded project is a collaborative initiative of the Latino Migration Project, The Southern Oral History Program and the University Libraries.

New Roots was established in 2007 to document demographic transformations in the U.S. South with stories of migration, settlement and integration in North Carolina. Read more at http://migration.unc.edu/programs/new-roots/

This growing collection of oral histories focuses on issues related to Latino migration to North Carolina and the formation of Latino communities.  Interviews are conducted by LMP staff, UNC faculty and trained students in courses relating to the topic, including APPLES Global Course Guanajuato, which began conducting interviews in 2007.  In-depth interviews in this collection are in Spanish or English and include immigrants, U.S.-born second generations, professionals who work with immigrants, policy-makers, religious leaders, educators, students, and local business owners. Our partners in the Southern Oral History Program and Wilson Library assist with digitization, catalogue, and preservation of audio recordings and transcripts.

RSVP by May 28 to Hannah Gill, hgill@email.unc.edu

 

March 3, 2014: Read the 2014 LMP Newsletter

 

The 2014 Newsletter is out!

Click to read it now!

 

February 14, 2014: Building Integrated Communities Receives Grant to Expand

 

 

The Latino Migration Project at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has received a two-year grant from the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation to expand Building Integrated Communities, an initiative that strengthens civic engagement, linguistic achievement and economic and educational advancement for immigrants in North Carolina municipalities.

Building Integrated Communities is a statewide initiative that helps North Carolina’s local governments engage with immigrants and refugee populations to improve public safety, promote economic development, enhance communication and improve relationships. The program helps local governments and diverse community stakeholders develop tools to generate locally relevant strategies to strengthen immigrant civic engagement, linguistic achievement and economic and educational advancement.

Read more here:

UNC Global Announcement

Z. Smith Reynolds Announcement

 

April 19, 2014: First Listen: New Roots/Nuevas Raíces

“Years ago, we felt there was this huge blind spot: migration, people from Latin America coming into this state. Little by little, it’s been developing into a full scale program that belongs to what we see as a new paradigm for studying Latin American presence not only in Latin America, but the Latin American presence in the United States.” -Louis A. Pérez, Director of the Institute for the Study of the Americas